Archive for October 2017

Quiet Sunday morning

Posted on October 22nd, 2017 in Dee Why.

Hello Friends,
Light westerly breeze under mostly cloudy skies as of 0730 Sunday morning at Dee Why. Yesterday’s little south pulse has faded away to pretty much nothing. Out at sea swell is about a metre from the SE at 7-8 sec, but along the beach and at the point in Dee Why, there didn’t appear to be any sign of a catchable wave. There could be ankle to knee high mal or SUP’able bumps at optimally aligned stretches, but that’s about it for us this morning.
Have to say that I’m not liking the look of the swell models this morning. They’re pretty much all showing flat to near flat to at least Thursday evening-Friday morning.
Wish it was otherwise everybody, but that’s surfin’ in Sydney springtime.
Keep on smiling and have a top old Sunday!

No sign of activity at No Mans

You could have the point to yourself this morning

Weather Situation
A high pressure system south of the Bight with a ridge to the east is directing south to southeasterly winds along the New South Wales coast. The high is moving east and it will move over the Tasman Sea during Tuesday extending the ridge to the northwest and winds are expected to turn northeast to northwesterly.
Forecast for Sunday until midnight
Winds
Variable about 10 knots becoming southerly 10 to 15 knots in the late afternoon.
Seas
Below 1 metre.
Swell
Southerly around 1 metre.
Weather
Partly cloudy. 80% chance of showers.
Monday 23 October
Winds
Southerly 15 to 20 knots turning east to southeasterly below 10 knots in the evening.
Seas
1 to 1.5 metres, increasing to 1.5 to 2 metres during the morning, then decreasing to 1 metre during the afternoon.
Swell
Southerly around 1 metre, increasing to 1 to 1.5 metres during the morning.
Weather
Partly cloudy. 30% chance of a shower offshore in the morning and early afternoon. Near zero chance of rain elsewhere.
Tuesday 24 October
Winds
North to northeasterly 15 to 20 knots tending north to northwesterly during the evening.
Seas
Below 1 metre, increasing to 1 to 1.5 metres during the afternoon.
Swell
Southerly 1 to 1.5 metres.
Weather
Mostly sunny.


Junky and chunky but not flat

Posted on October 21st, 2017 in Dee Why.

Hello Friends,

Slightly chilly and breezy under mostly cloudy skies around 0630 when I did the Saturday radio report check out run. Quality, as the pictures show, was not great. It was inconsistent, choppy and around the waist to chest high range on the biggest ones. There were a couple bods chasing lumps at Northy, but that was it from there south to Collaroy. Around at the Long Reef to Dee Why stretch there were a few hopefuls scattered along the beach and a small crew at the point. Again, the quality is not great and the swell looks pretty much as you’d expect when the forecast says it’s going to fade this morning. So, expect lulls and a challenge when you try to catch one.
According to the 0400 data from the MHL buoy off Sydney, it was close to 3 metres from the south with a period of 9 seconds – but I definitely wasn’t seeing anything remotely in the 3 metre range. Tide is running into a 1.7 m high at 1000.
Wind was out of the WSW early but it should go around to the south as the day goes along. At the same time the swell’s going to fade and right now the outlook for the rest of the week is less than inspiring. Basically it looks like being knee high at south magnets when the tide’s just right for the early part of the week. After that… not too exciting I’m afraid.
Ah well, it is spring.
Have a great Saturday!

Northy at 0630

Bodyboarder picks one up at the point 0640

Messy peaks near the Pole

Narrabeen looking less than spectacular at 0630

Shutdown at south Narra


Weather Situation
Southerly winds along the New South Wales coast are easing as a high pressure system south of the Bight strengthens a ridge to the east. The high will move over the Tasman Sea during Tuesday extending the ridge to the northwest and winds are expected to turn northeast to northwesterly.
Forecast for Saturday until midnight
Winds
Southerly 15 to 20 knots decreasing to about 10 knots in the late evening.
Seas
1 to 2 metres, decreasing to 1 metre around midday.
Swell
Southerly 1.5 to 2 metres, decreasing to 1 to 1.5 metres during the morning.
Weather
Cloudy.
Sunday 22 October
Winds
Variable about 10 knots.
Seas
Below 1 metre.
Swell
Southerly around 1 metre inshore, increasing to 1 to 1.5 metres offshore.
Weather
Partly cloudy. 60% chance of showers.
Monday 23 October
Winds
Southerly 10 to 15 knots becoming variable about 10 knots during the afternoon.
Seas
Below 1 metre.
Swell
Southerly 1 to 1.5 metres.
Weather
Partly cloudy. 40% chance of showers.


Rainy morning at last

Posted on October 20th, 2017 in Dee Why.

Hello Friends,

Good to see the rainy weather at last. But no real energy showing at Dee Why as of 0715. Three hours earlier, the MHL buoy was showing 1.8 metres of 8-sec NE wind swell as the dominant influence. The directional spectrum plot was also showing similar levels of energy out of the south and the Bureau is calling for an increase in that component later today. Wind was lightly from the SW at picture taking time and tide was coming into a 1.66 m high at 0925. Unfortunately the wind is going ramp up from the south and get into the the 20-30 kt range  by midday. So, not a great prospect for surfing.

The Goat unveiled his forecast for the weekend last night and as always, I commend his wisdom to you.
Have a great Friday everyone!
 

Quiet this morning

Nup

Weather Situation

A trough and associated cold front is moving through the south coast of New South Wales. A vigorous southerly change associated with the frontal system should reach the central parts of the coast during the afternoon, and continue to the Queensland border early Saturday. fresh to strong northerly winds are expected to continue ahead of the front. Behind the front, a new high in the Bight will extend a ridge into New South Wales during the weekend before the high moves into the Tasman Sea in the early part of next week.

Forecast for Friday until midnight

Strong Wind Warning for Friday for Sydney Coast

Winds
West to northwesterly 10 to 15 knots tending north to northwesterly 15 to 25 knots in the morning then shifting southerly 20 to 30 knots in the middle of the day.
Seas
1 to 2 metres, decreasing below 1 metre during the morning, then increasing to 2 to 3 metres around midday.
1st Swell
Northeasterly 1 to 2 metres.
2nd Swell
Southerly below 0.5 metres, increasing to 1 to 1.5 metres by early evening.
Weather
Cloudy. Near 100% chance of rain.

Saturday 21 October

Winds
Southerly 15 to 25 knots decreasing to about 10 knots in the evening.
Seas
2 to 2.5 metres, decreasing to 1 to 1.5 metres during the morning, then decreasing to 1 metre around midday.
1st Swell
Southerly 1.5 to 2 metres, decreasing to 1 to 1.5 metres during the morning.
2nd Swell
East to northeasterly around 1 metre.
Weather
Cloudy. 30% chance of a shower.

Sunday 22 October

Winds
Variable about 10 knots.
Seas
Below 1 metre.
Swell
Southerly around 1 metre inshore, increasing to 1 to 1.5 metres offshore.
Weather
Partly cloudy. 30% chance of a shower.

TG’s Surf Forecast

Posted on October 19th, 2017 in Goat's Forecast.

Surf forecast issued Thursday 19 October 2017: Seven day outlook for Sydney:

Fab weather today… Sunny, 26, Noreaster pushing in some waves at the right places/ right tides.

But if you’re making hay, then you might want to get stuck into it, because the Bureau is saying there’s a 100 % chance it’ll get wet tomorrow!  That’s a pretty big call.

Meanwhile, what’ll it do for the surf??  In the morning it’ll still be NE windswell, then as the forecast Southerly arrives it’ll be all chopped up and messy, then later when you’re going to bed it’ll start to pick up a bit. But don’t fret…Then it’ll settle into a windy dead southerly swell day and you might decide to stay in bed.

Maybe come out of hibernation Sunday, but with onshore conditions making it pretty ordinary you might want to have a fallback activity to surfing.

If you’re lucky enough there might be some little waves and better weather during the week.

Friday: in the 1-2 metre range from the North East, ahead of a Southerly change that’ll just mess things up

Saturday: upper end of the 1-2 metre range, choppy and windy and cool at dead South spots

Sunday: lower end of the 1-2 metre range South East

Monday: ditto

Tuesday: about 1 metre or so South East

Wednesday: 1 metre or less South East

Thursday: ditto East.

Nice little story Don found here>>>

Hang ten (decades): Walter Munk, inventor of the surf forecast, turns 100

Have fun!

But not yet if you’re makin’ hay!

TG

Up in the Sky

MSLP Analysis for Thu Oct 19 00:00:00 2017 AUTC

Cloud/surface composite, Australia satellite image of Australia at Thu Oct 19 05:30:00 2017

Winds

https://www.windy.com/?-33.861,151.198,5

Down in the Sea

Water temp is around 18 according to the MHL buoy but it’s warmer than that in the surf.  You can see from the BoM satellite pic: warm water (about 20) nearshore, then a cooler stretch (where the MHL buoy would be) then warmer water further out from that.  (No, the water isn’t really coloured yellow).

image

Tides

http://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/documents/maritime/usingwaterways/tides-weather/tide-tables-2017-2018.pdf

Weather from the Bureau:

Forecast for the rest of Thursday

Summary
Becoming cloudy.
Chance of any rain: 10% 

Sydney area

Becoming cloudy. Slight (20%) chance of rain later tonight. Winds northeasterly 25 to 35 km/h decreasing to 15 to 20 km/h in the late evening.

Sun protection recommended from 9:00 am to 4:10 pm, UV Index predicted to reach 9 [Very High]

Friday 20 October

Summary
Min 18
Max 20
Rain. Becoming windy.
Possible rainfall: 15 to 25 mm
Chance of any rain: 100%

Sydney area

Cloudy. Very high (near 100%) chance of rain, most likely in the morning and afternoon. Light winds becoming northwest to northeasterly 15 to 25 km/h in the morning, then tending southerly 25 to 35 km/h in the middle of the day and reaching 35 to 45 km/h near the coast.

Fire Danger – Low-Moderate

Sun protection recommended from 9:00 am to 4:10 pm, UV Index predicted to reach 9 [Very High]

 

Saturday 21 October

Summary
Min 14
Max 20
Partly cloudy.
Possible rainfall: 0 mm
Chance of any rain: 20% 

Sydney area

Partly cloudy. Slight (20%) chance of a shower along the coastal fringe in the morning afternoon. Winds south to southwesterly 15 to 25 km/h tending south to southeasterly 15 to 20 km/h in the middle of the day then becoming light in the evening.

Sun protection recommended from 9:10 am to 3:50 pm, UV Index predicted to reach 8 [Very High]

Sunday 22 October

Summary
Min 13
Max 22
Partly cloudy.
Possible rainfall: 0 mm
Chance of any rain: 20% 

Sydney area

Partly cloudy. Slight (20%) chance of a shower in the afternoon and evening. Light winds.

Sun protection recommended from 9:10 am to 3:50 pm, UV Index predicted to reach 8 [Very High]

Monday 23 October

Summary
Min 15
Max 22
Possible shower.
Possible rainfall: 0 to 0.4 mm
Chance of any rain: 30% 

Sydney area

Partly cloudy. Slight (30%) chance of a shower, most likely in the morning and afternoon. Light winds becoming east to northeasterly 15 to 20 km/h during the afternoon then becoming light during the evening.

Tuesday 24 October

Summary
Min 14
Max 26
Mostly sunny.
Possible rainfall: 0 mm
Chance of any rain: 5% 

Sydney area

Mostly sunny. Winds northwest to northeasterly 15 to 20 km/h tending east to northeasterly 15 to 25 km/h during the day.

Wednesday 25 October

Summary
Min 16
Max 28
Partly cloudy.
Possible rainfall: 0 mm
Chance of any rain: 20% 

Sydney area

Partly cloudy. Slight (30%) chance of a shower. Light winds.

Thursday 26 October

Summary
Min 20
Max 31
Possible shower.
Possible rainfall: 0 to 1 mm
Chance of any rain: 40% 

Sydney area

Partly cloudy. Medium (40%) chance of showers later in the day. Winds north to northwesterly 20 to 30 km/h shifting south to southwesterly 15 to 25 km/h during the day.


Hang ten (decades): Walter Munk, inventor of the surf forecast, turns 100

Posted on October 19th, 2017 in Top stories.

 

File 20171018 32375 guhxwz.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1
Like big waves? Thanks to surf forecasting, you’ll know when and where to find them.
Shalom Jacobovitz/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA

Paul Spence, UNSW and Shane Keating, UNSW

As dawn washes over Bondi Beach, you can see the surfers beyond the break, gently rising and falling on their boards. They gather like this when the surf forecast tells them a big swell is rolling in, carrying energy from a ferocious Antarctic storm thousands of kilometres away.

From Bondi to Bundoran, Pipeline to Mavericks, surfers around the world depend on the surf forecast to catch the perfect wave. Its inventor, Walter Munk, is 100 today – yet few surfers know his name, despite the debt of gratitude they owe him.

Walter Munk: the father of surf forecasting.
Holger Motzkau/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA

‘Einstein of the ocean’

Munk might be under-appreciated in surfing circles, but he’s a big deal in ocean science. He has been described as the “greatest living oceanographer” and the “Einstein of the ocean”.

His list of accolades is astounding. There is a unit of measurement named after him: the “Munk unit”. There’s a species of ray called Mobula munkiana. There’s even a Walter Munk Award for outstanding contributions to oceanography, which of course he has won.

Munk has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of ocean circulation, geology and climate change. But perhaps his most influential work is the science of wave prediction, which he developed while still a doctoral student in California.

Wartime expertise

After graduating from Caltech in 1938, Munk began a PhD with renowned Norwegian oceanographer Harald Sverdrup in the sleepy seaside town of La Jolla. Distressed by Germany’s annexation of his native Austria, Munk became a US citizen and joined the war effort, first as an army private and later with the US Navy Radio and Sound Laboratory.

While observing Allied troops training for an amphibious invasion of Northwest Africa, Munk noticed that waves were pummelling the landing craft as they approached the beach. He immediately called Sverdrup, and together they developed techniques for predicting ocean waves and surf conditions for amphibious warfare.

Their methods were so successful that the Allied forces used these to predict wave conditions for the D-Day landings at Normandy. Based on those predictions, General Eisenhower delayed the operation, the largest naval invasion in history, until June 6, 1944. Undoubtedly, Munk’s research saved thousands of Allied lives and helped bring about the end of World War II.

Waves across the Pacific

Thus began a lifelong fascination with ocean waves. In 1963 Munk, then a professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, led a team of scientist studying how swells generated by Antarctic storms travel more than 16,000km across the Pacific Ocean.

The team set up stations to measure the waves as they travelled in a great circle from New Zealand to Alaska. Munk and his family spent more than a month in American Samoa for the experiment, monitoring pressure sensors mounted on the ocean floor and recording data on paper tape punched with holes.

The experiment yielded a surprising discovery. The waves showed very little decay in energy on their journey across the Pacific. The biggest change was a shift in the observed period of the wave – that is, the time between passing crests. Munk’s team found that the period increased as the waves moved northwards.

This happens because ocean waves are dispersive, meaning that the speed of the wave depends on the period. Long-period waves move more rapidly, so they run to the front of the pack, while shorter-period waves lag behind. The phenomenon is well known to surfers, who experience this dispersive ordering as a gradual shortening of the time between sets of waves.

Order from ‘lovely confusion’

In a 1967 documentary that Munk made with his wife Judith about the experiment in the Pacific, he describes how an orderly ocean swell can emerge from the chaos of an Antarctic storm. Using the analogy of tossing a handful of pebbles into a pond, Munk describes how the water surface is initially broken up in “lovely confusion”. But eventually a steady procession of ripples can be seen spreading outwards from the point of impact – regular and predictable.

Munk’s Pacific documentary.

Munk’s pioneering work on ocean swells, together with his wartime research on wave prediction, gave birth to the science of surf forecasting. In 2007 his contribution to surfing was formally recognised by the Groundswell Society, a surfing advocacy group. Munk later recalled:

I have been fortunate in receiving the recognitions that are traditional in a scientific career. But none gave me as much unexpected pleasure as this recognition by the Groundswell Society. I was utterly delighted.

After more than eight decades of ocean science, Munk shows no signs of slowing down. He is still hard at work, researching and speaking at international conferences. As the worldwide oceanographic community prepares to celebrate his centenary, Munk’s enthusiasm for discovery has not dimmed.

In an interview this month, Munk revealed what keeps him going. “More enthusiasm than knowledge. That’s been the key of my career — to get excited before I understand it.”

The ConversationHang loose, Walter.

Paul Spence, Senior Lecturer, Climate Change Research Centre, UNSW and Shane Keating, Senior Lecturer in Mathematics and Oceanography, UNSW

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.


More activity, but is it surfable?

Posted on October 19th, 2017 in Dee Why.

Hello Friends,
Wind was a light but steady northerly at 0700. It should swing around to the NE later and should be a strong 20-25 kts by dusk. The MHL spectrum analysis was showing both a small south component and two metres of 6-sec NE wind swell as of 0400. Tide was coming into the 0845 high when I grabbed the snaps around 0700. I couldn’t see anyone in the water at the point or up the beach toward No Mans. I imagine if you were really keen there’d be the odd knee to waist high bit of semi-catchable chop in that zone, but given the dominant NE direction, Curly might be a better choice, or possibly North Narra.
The Goat should be along with his outlook late today and as always I’ll be keen to see what he thinks about the prospects. My reading of the runes suggests we’re in for another quiet week surfwise, but we’ll see what the guy with half a century of experience thinks.
Looks like an otherwise nice day coming up, so keep the stoke alive and have a good one!

More activity than yesterday

No sign of significant energy at 0700


Weather Situation
A strong high pressure system lies over the Tasman Sea, while a trough and associated cold front approach New South Wales from the west. This pattern is bringing east to northeasterly winds to coastal parts, fresh to strong in many areas. A vigorous southerly change associated with the frontal system should reach the southern coast early Friday morning, continuing through central parts during the afternoon, and continue to the Queensland border early Saturday. Behind this, a new high in the Bight will extend a ridge into New South Wales during the weekend.
Forecast for Thursday until midnight
Strong Wind Warning for Thursday for Sydney Coast
Winds
North to northeasterly 20 to 25 knots, reaching up to 30 knots offshore in the evening.
Seas
1.5 to 2.5 metres.
Swell
Northeasterly 1 to 1.5 metres.
Weather
Partly cloudy.
Friday 20 October
Strong Wind Warning for Friday for Sydney Coast
Winds
Northerly 20 to 30 knots decreasing to 15 to 25 knots before dawn then shifting southerly 20 to 30 knots in the middle of the day.
Seas
1.5 to 2.5 metres.
1st Swell
Northeasterly 1 to 2 metres.
2nd Swell
Southerly below 1 metre, increasing to 1 to 1.5 metres by evening.
Weather
Cloudy. 90% chance of rain.
Saturday 21 October
Winds
Southerly 15 to 25 knots tending southeasterly 10 to 15 knots during the evening.
Seas
1.5 to 2.5 metres, decreasing to 1 metre during the afternoon.
1st Swell
Southerly 1 to 2 metres.
2nd Swell
East to northeasterly around 1 metre.
Weather
Cloudy.


Bumps but not a lot more

Posted on October 18th, 2017 in Dee Why.

Hello Friends,

Light NNE wind lumping up the full conditions at 0730 when I grabbed the pictures. Tide was just running into a 1.6 m high at 0810. The MHL buoy’s 0400 data indicated 1.7 m of 9-second wind bump from the NE and as a consequence there wasn’t much going on at Dee Why. The point didn’t really seem to be an option and the beach break out in front of the club was struggling to get above knee high. Checking some of the local cams indicates that it’s maybe a touch bigger at NE spots, but not dramatically so. A nice morning for a paddle (water’s around the 19° mark), but not so much for surfing.
The wind is set to pick up into the strong range later, so for fans of sideshore, short-period wind junk may find something of interest toward dusk. But the quality setting will not be at the high end of the range.
Between now and the end of the week the models point to a mixed bag surfwise. Tomorrow is likely to be similar to today and Friday should be windy again from the north at first, going southerly during the morning as some short period south stuff follows it in later. Oh, and there’s an 80% chance of rain too.
Have a great day one and all!

Maybe you could get something on a SUP at the point. around 0730 Maybe.

Nothing much at No Mans

Rider jags a bump at Kiddies 0730

Weather Situation
A high pressure system over the central Tasman Sea with a ridge to the west is directing east to northeasterly winds along the New South Wales coast which will continue today as the high moves further east. The next southerly change is expected to develop on the south coast Thursday night then extending to the north coast during Friday.
Forecast for Wednesday until midnight
Winds
Northeasterly 15 to 20 knots, reaching up to 25 knots offshore in the late evening.
Seas
Around 1 metre, increasing to 1 to 1.5 metres during the morning.
Swell
Northeasterly 1 to 1.5 metres.
Weather
Partly cloudy.
Thursday 19 October
Strong Wind Warning for Thursday for Sydney Coast
Winds
North to northeasterly 20 to 25 knots, reaching up to 30 knots offshore in the evening.
Seas
1.5 to 2.5 metres.
Swell
Northeasterly 1 to 1.5 metres.
Weather
Mostly sunny.
Friday 20 October
Winds
Northerly 20 to 30 knots shifting southerly during the morning.
Seas
2 to 3 metres.
1st Swell
Southerly below 0.5 metres, increasing to 1 to 2 metres during the afternoon.
2nd Swell
Northeasterly 1.5 to 2 metres, decreasing to 1 to 1.5 metres during the morning.
Weather
Cloudy. 80% chance of rain.


Weak and tiny Tuesday morning

Posted on October 17th, 2017 in Dee Why.

Hello Friends,

Another tiny morning for Dee Why. According to the 0400 observations from MHL, there was 1 metre of 12 sec east swell out at sea. Dee Why’s not much of an east magnet, so there wasn’t much above ankle to knee high at the southern end of the beach. There should be slightly more around at Curly and maybe up at Northy as the tide drops from the 1.5 m high at 0725. It’ll be low again at 1330.
Wind was light from the NW when I grabbed the pics but should get around to the NE by midday. The models are a bit all over the place this morning, but the most optimistic are saying Friday afternoon-Saturday morning
Outlook is for the NE energy levels to increase along with the afternoon NE wind in the afternoons – so a summery pattern. And that means the usual north corners strategy comes into play. The models are a bit all over the place, but it looks as though late Thursday might be fun at NE spots (knee to chest) and small but just surfable on Saturday morning at south spots (though onshore from the south).
Keep on smilin’ and have a great day!

Too small for the point at 0710

Keep moving north, nothing at No Mans

Weather Situation
A high pressure system over the central Tasman Sea with a ridge to the west is directing easterly winds along the New South Wales coast. Winds will tend east to northeasterly today and on Wednesday as the high moves further east maintaining the ridge to the northwest. The next southerly change is expected to develop on the south coast Thursday night then extending to the north coast during Friday.
Forecast for Tuesday until midnight
Winds
Northeasterly about 10 knots increasing to 10 to 15 knots in the middle of the day.
Seas
Around 1 metre.
Swell
Northeasterly around 1 metre inshore, increasing to 1.5 metres offshore.
Weather
Cloudy.
Wednesday 18 October
Winds
Northeasterly 15 to 20 knots.
Seas
Around 1 metre, increasing to 1 to 1.5 metres around midday.
Swell
Northeasterly 1.5 metres.
Weather
Partly cloudy.
Thursday 19 October
Winds
Northeasterly 15 to 25 knots turning northerly 20 to 25 knots during the evening.
Seas
1.5 to 2.5 metres.
Swell
Northeasterly 1 to 1.5 metres, decreasing to around 1 metre during the evening.
Weather
Mostly sunny.


Little bumps on a sunny morning

Posted on October 16th, 2017 in Dee Why.

Hello Friends,
A faint NE breeze was giving the ocean a little texture at 0715. Not the ideal wind direction for Dee Why, but since there is no swell to speak of, it’s all theoretical anyway. The most interesting thing on the MNL buoy this morning isn’t the odd read out for Sydney (SE 1.2 m at 15-sec), but the data from way up north at Byron where they’re seeing 3 metres of 9-sec SSE wind swell. But don’t feel too jealous because Cape Byron is seeing 20-30 kts of east wind with it.
The Bureau’s forecast and the models are aligned as to our prospects for the next few days. The good news is that it looks like we should see a gradual but very slight, very gradual movement upward in average wave heights which may, toward the end of the week get us into the waist to chest plus range by Friday. Between now and then though most models are projecting flat to very marginal conditions at Dee Why.
Enjoy your sunny Monday and stay stoked!

No sign of a line at No Mans as of 0715

Slightly more activity than yesterday am, but still not surfable at the point


Weather Situation
A high pressure system over the central Tasman Sea, in combination with a low pressure trough off the southern coast of Queensland, is directing east to southeasterly winds over most New South Wales waters. Winds will gradually shift east to northeasterly during the next few days as the high strengthens and the trough loses influence. The next southerly change is expected over southern and central waters on Friday.
Forecast for Monday until midnight
Winds
Easterly 10 to 15 knots.
Seas
Below 1 metre.
Swell
Northeasterly around 1 metre.
Weather
Partly cloudy.
Tuesday 17 October
Winds
Easterly 10 to 15 knots tending northeasterly 15 to 20 knots in the morning.
Seas
1 to 1.5 metres.
Swell
Northeasterly 1 to 1.5 metres.
Weather
Cloudy.
Wednesday 18 October
Winds
Northeasterly 15 to 20 knots.
Seas
1 to 1.5 metres, increasing to 1.5 to 2 metres during the afternoon or evening.
Swell
Northeasterly 1.5 metres.
Weather
Partly cloudy.


Spring conditions

Posted on October 15th, 2017 in Dee Why.

Hello Friends,

The pictures tell the story surfers. Mostly cloudy skies with a steady 8-10 kts of SE wind chopping up the surface of a swell-free ocean. The MHL buoy was showing 1.3 m of 10-sec SSE swell, but there’s no hint of energy at Dee Why, however you might get a little mal-able dribble up toward Longy. A quick check of the local cams showed ankle to knee high at spots with optimal exposure. An easy day to give it a pass I’d say.
The Bureau’s modelling (and others too) is offering a little more hope for the coming week. On current reckoning we could see a gradual increase in energy levels from the NE from around midwekk onward. It’s not shaping to be amazing, but waist to chest high at NE magnets by Thr-Fri doesn’t seem wildly optimistic.
Have a great Sunday everyone and keep on smilin’!

No surfin’ this morning at
DY

Choppy sea with no waves

Weather Situation
A high pressure system over the central Tasman Sea and a low pressure trough off the far south coast of Queensland is generating east to southeasterly winds over most New South Wales waters. Winds will gradually will shift east to northeasterly during the next few days as the high strengthens and the trough slowly moves northwards.
Forecast for Sunday until midnight
Winds
East to southeasterly 10 to 15 knots decreasing to about 10 knots in the day.
Seas
Around 1 metre, decreasing below 1 metre during the day.
Swell
Southerly around 1 metre.
Weather
Partly cloudy. 20% chance of a shower.
Monday 16 October
Winds
Easterly 10 to 15 knots.
Seas
Below 1 metre.
Swell
Northeasterly around 1 metre.
Weather
Partly cloudy. 30% chance of a shower.
Tuesday 17 October
Winds
Easterly 10 to 15 knots.
Seas
1 to 1.5 metres.
Swell
Northeasterly 1 to 1.5 metres.
Weather
Partly cloudy. 30% chance of a shower.


 

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