Posts in Can you help?

NORTHERN BEACHES JOIN THE LARGEST DAY OF CLIMATE ACTION IN HISTORY

Posted on October 19th, 2009 in Can you help?, Environment, For the Diary, Good causes, Local Colour, News Stories, Surf culture, Surf News, Surf politics, Top stories.
For example . . .

For example . . .

2000+ EVENTS AROUND THE WORLD

On Saturday 24 October 2009 Northern Beaches residents will join hundreds of thousands of people from around the world in taking a stand for a safe climate future as part of the largest global day of climate action ever witnessed.

The call to action by both Climate Action Pittwater and Manly Warringah Climate Action Group as well as local surf life saving clubs, and hosted by Pittwater, Warringah and Manly Councils, will spell out the numerals ‘350’ (i.e. 350 parts per million, signifying the safe upper level of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere) via human signs on local beaches.

“People are turning out in great numbers in Australia and around the world on 24 October to call on global leaders to hear the public concern about climate change before the UN talks in Copenhagen in December,” said a spokesperson for the Climate Change Groups.

“Scientists are saying that our current greenhouse emissions at 385ppm are at a dangerous level.
“350 sends a clear message to our community and our leaders that we cannot afford to be skeptical anymore and that we need to set a clear and ambitious goal to work towards at the Copenhagen meeting.
“Individuals and families in every corner of the world will be taking similar action from Mount Everest and the Taj Mahal to the Great Barrier Reef and the Sydney Opera House.”
The Northern Beaches climate action groups have the support of local Mayors, Councils, politicians and community groups who will be gathering at three locations (Mona Vale beach, Dee Why beach, and North Steyne beach) at 3.00pm on Saturday 24 October.

The events are three of more than 2,000 rallies in more than 140 nations coordinated by the organization ‘350.org’ and urging world leaders to take fast and effective action on climate change.
“This is the first global campaign ever organised around a scientific data point,” said the climate change group spokesperson.
“It’s also significant that we organize the human signs on our local beaches as increasing sea levels will see our iconic beaches disappear in the future.
“Everyone has a responsibility in combating climate change. We can each make a difference to reducing our own carbon footprints.
“We are encouraging the residents of the Northern Beaches to register their interest and to join us on this day so that we can to get our world back to 350 and a safe climate future.”
To find out more about ‘350’ go to www.350.org/australia.

To register go to:
Dee Why Beach http://www.350.org/node/7325;
Manly Beach http://www.350.org/node/7523
Mona Vale Beach http://www.350.org/node/7327
Spokespersons to contact include:
Iain McGregor (Manly): 0400 481 259.
Kirsten Evans (Dee Why): 0438 177 088.
Linda Haefeli (Pittwater) 0409 815 119.
To make the sign more effective it would be suitable to wear something black, green, blue or red on the day.
For media information contact Ron Krueger on 0418 617 680.
ENDORSEMENTS
“The gathering of world leaders in Copenhagen for the UN Climate Change Conference in December this year offers what may be the last, best chance for determining concerted action to prevent the worst effects of global warming.
Representing a coastal community likely to be profoundly affected by rising sea levels, Manly Council is committed to developing strategies that promote the conservation of the natural environment to benefit current and future generations; including long term considerations of climate change.
Therefore, as the Mayor of Manly, I fully support the objectives of the ‘350’ campaign and encourage all who love Manly to come along and take part on the day.” – Jean Hay, Mayor of Manly
I am proud to support this initiative and encourage Warringah residents to take a stand on the sand on the day.” – Michael Regan, Mayor of Warringah.
“I encourage Pittwater residents to get behind this great initiative and to send a clear message that we need to limit our emissions to avoid runaway climate change.” – Harvey Rose, Mayor of Pittwater.
“This event is a great opportunity for the Northern Beaches community to show their support for more action on climate change. The lack of public transport on the Peninsula means more cars are clogging up the roads and that has to change. Our beautiful local environment is why we love living on the Northern Beaches and it must be protected for future generations.” – Mike Baird, Member for Manly

“Our coastline and particularly beaches are hugely threatened by rising sea levels and the predicted more numerous and potent storms bought on by climate change and here is an unmissable chance to send your message.” -Brendan Donohue, Surfrider Foundation Northern Beaches Chapter.
“Mona Vale SLSC is proud to be hosting Pittwater’s 350 event. Surf Life Saving Clubs, by their very nature, are particularly vulnerable to coastal erosion and the probable implications of sea level rise. Becoming involved in this public display of climate change action raises the awareness of our 700+ members and their families. Surf Lifesavers and ‘Nippers’ all have a role to play in addressing climate change, and this event is another way MVSLSC is taking action”. – Jon Dibbs – President and Life Member of Mona Vale Surf Life Saving Club.
ABOUT 350.ORG
Founded by author and environmentalist Bill McKibben, 350.org is the first large-scale grassroots global campaign against climate change. Its supporters include leading scientists, the governments of 89 countries, and a huge variety of environmental, health, development and religious NGOs. All agree that current atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases—385 parts per million—are causing damage to the planet and to its most vulnerable people, and that government action at the Copenhagen climate conference is required to bring the earth’s carbon level swiftly down.


“TRANSPARENTSEA” – A MODERN JOURNEY WITH ANCIENT CREATURES

Posted on September 30th, 2009 in Can you help?, Environment, Good causes, Local Colour, News Stories, Surf culture, Surf history, Surf News, Surf politics, Top stories.
Professional Surfer and environmental campaigner Dave Rastovich and the sea kayak he will navigate to Sydney.

Professional Surfer and environmental campaigner Dave Rastovich and the sea kayak he will navigate to Sydney.

Professional surfer Dave Rastovich initiates a bold environmental awareness campaign tomorrow from Byron Bay.

Professional free-surfer and environmental campaigner David Rastovich will attempt an epic 700km ocean paddle from Byron Bay to Bondi Beach this October.

The journey aims to follow the annual migration south of humpback whales and their calves while raising awareness of the need to protect the majestic mammals and the world’s ocean environments.

Twenty nine year-old Rastovich (Brunswick Heads, AUS) is using the paddle to extend his personal environmental journey which in 2006 saw him co-found the “Surfers for Cetaceans” movement and in July this year saw him granted one of just 200 invitations to attend former US Vice President Al Gore’s The Climate Project – Asia-Pacific Summit.

On October 1st “Rasta”, accompanied by world-class water photographer Hilton Dawe (Byron Bay, AUS) and a videographer who will help chronicle the event, will step from the sands of Main Beach, Byron Bay and begin the journey in single-seat sea kayaks.

Joining them will be Chris Del Moro (Los Angeles, USA) a respected free surfer, activist, artist and co-director of Surfers for Cetaceans.

Assisted only by the wind and waves, Rasta and his cohorts will paddle the entire distance aiming to reach Bondi by November 5th. Each afternoon they will paddle to the nearest beach, rest overnight, engage with local communities and – conditions permitting – take advantage of the local surf.

The primary intention of the journey is to draw attention to the plight of the migrating whales that ultimately are destined for the chilly waters of the Southern Ocean and the inevitable visits by Japanese whaling fleets.

In addition, the team will record and highlight other areas of environmental concern including the effects of the commercial fishing industry on marine mammals and fish stocks; run-off issues to do with agricultural, domestic and industrial human activities; the state of rivers and estuaries; and where necessary they will also initiate beach clean-ups.

It is a well-intentioned odyssey that, at worst, is certain to be an incredible test of endurance but will also, quite possibly, double as the surf-trip-of-a-lifetime.

“What excites me the most is being able to combine the high-risk elements of surfing and sailing and the notion of endurance and pushing your body,” said Rastovich.  “I’m eager to bring those elements together with environmental awareness initiatives.

“Our intentions are that, after 36 days and 700 kilometers, we’ll have helped educate a lot of people on the beauty and majesty of the whales, plus the impact we all have on what is such an amazing stretch of coastline and in what ways we might all implement positive change.”

An additional kayak will be made available to a small roster of like-minded invited guests – individuals who share the mission’s sense of purpose and who are able to help bolster public awareness.

Participants already scheduled to take part include eight-time Molokai-to-Oahu paddling champion Jamie Mitchell, former world #5, pro surfer Matt Hoy, and professional surf commentator, editor and musician Adam ‘Vaughan’ Blakey.

“Our intentions are to reach Bondi and celebrate the completion of our voyage with Captain Paul Watson of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society,” said Rastovich.

“We expect to be crossing paths with the Sea Shepherd crew on the journey as they take their ship, the Steve Irwin, to Perth where they will launch their next campaign to save our whales in Antarctica. The same whales we will be paddling alongside.”

The official Transparentsea launch will take place on Thursday, October 1st at Main Beach, Byron Bay. Here, members of the Aboriginal Bundjalung tribe will don traditional dress and perform a farewell ceremony. Following the ceremony, the kayakers will paddle out to meet the whales and begin their long voyage south to Sydney.

Transparentsea participants (L to R): Surfer Dave Rastovich, musician Will Conner, Surfrider Foundation's Kristy Theissling and Californian surfer, artist and campaigner Chris Del Moro. Photographed today in Byron Bay.

Transparentsea participants (L to R): Surfer Dave Rastovich, musician Will Conner, Surfrider Foundation's Kristy Theissling and Californian surfer, artist and campaigner Chris Del Moro. Photographed today in Byron Bay.


Active surfers need for surf injury research project

Posted on May 23rd, 2009 in Can you help?, Top stories.

Can you help?

Can you help?

Margaret Plag, a Masters student in the School of Biomedical and Health Sciences at the University of Western Sydney, Australia, is in the process of surveying surfers to determine the incidence, severity and outcomes of acute and chronic injuries from surfing. This is a new national survey that aims to identify the injuries experienced by surfers as the first step to making the sport kinder on the bodies of thousands of surfers.

If you are interested in participating in the study, are aged 18 to 50 years with three or more years surfing experience, then contact Marg on 0404 011 681 or email: 97406251@student.uws.edu.au

Once recruited to the trial the survey can be completed via hard copy or CD in the mail. Participants in the survey will complete a confidential retrospective questionnaire about their surfing habits, injuries and health over the last 12 months.


 

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